Building Survey

248 N. THIRD STREET (Film and Media Studies Program and Theatre Department)

Location: 248 N. Third Street

Dates: Purchased by the College on July 10, 2003

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Previously owned by Club Mohican, 248 N. Third Street was sold to Lafayette College in 2003.

2011
2011

635 HIGH STREET DORMITORY (Formerly the Kappa Delta Rho Fraternity House)

Location: 635 High Street

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Originally the home of the Tarms fraternity, this building was occupied by the Kappa Delta Rho fraternity in 1931. In 2011, 635 High Street was converted into a dormitory after the Kappa Delta Rho fraternity was closed due to disciplinary action. Today, it serves as a dormitory for male and female students.

635 High Street Dorm Old


4 WEST CAMPUS LANE (Formerly the Chi Phi Fraternity House, a.k.a Vallamont)

Location: 4 West Campus Lane

Dates: Built in 1909

Architect: Horace Trumbauer

Builder: Unknown

4 West Campus Lane formerly served as the Chi Phi House until it’s closure in 2005. Today the building serves as a dormitory.

 


49 SOUTH COLLEGE AVENUE (Formerly the Zeta Psi fraternity house)

Location: 49 South College Avenue

Dates: Built in 1910

Architect: James Barnes Baker and William Marsh Michler

Builder: Amandus Steinbmetz-Streepy

49 South College Avenue is a student dormitory. The Zeta Psi fraternity formerly lived there until they were suspended in 2014 due to disciplinary action.

49 South College Ave Old


ACOPIAN ENGINEERING CENTER

Location: West of Markle Hall

Dates: Dedicated on October 24, 2003

Architect: Anshen + Allen Baltimore MD

Builder: Telesis Construction, Inc., King of Prussia, PA

Engineers: Bala Consulting Engineers, Inc., Wynnewood, PA

The Acopian Engineering Center was dedicated on October 24, 2003 by Sarkis Acopian ’51 and his wife, Bobbye. This academic building houses the departments of Chemical Engineering, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

Various Lafayette College building scenics
2009

ALEXIS HALL (no longer standing)

Location: Behind Gayley Hall of Chemistry, in present location of Skillman Library

Dates: Transferred to Lafayette in 1946

Architect: Donald F. Innes, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

Builder: Boardman-Smith Corporation, Philadelphia

Alexis Hall was a wartime navy barracks that was transferred from Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, by the Federal Bureau of Community Facilities. This was accomplished by Captain Algert D. Alexis ’19, and the building was named for him. It was used as a temporary chemistry building during increased college enrollment after World War II. It was also used by other departments. Alexis Hall was taken down in 1957, after Olin Hall was completed, and the materials were removed by the Presbyterian Church for their use in the Presbytery at Snydersville, Pennsylvania.

Alexis Hall


ALPHA GAMMA DELTA HOUSE (Formerly the Sigma Nu Fraternity House)

Location: 511 College Avenue

Dates: Built in 1917

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Alpha Gamma Delta House is a living space for the Lafayette members of the AGD sorority. It is located at 511 College Avenue and was the former Sigma Nu House until that fraternity closed in 1995 due to disciplinary action.

AGD House
2015

ALPHA PHI HOUSE (Formerly the Theta Xi fraternity house)

Location: Four House Quadrangle

Dates: Built 1962; Alpha Phi moved into the house in 1996

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Home of the Alpha Phi sorority.

Alpha Phi House 2011
2011

ALUMNI HALL OF ENGINEERING

Location: West of Markle Hall, opposite Olin Hall

Dates: Built in 1952

Architect: Donald F. Innes, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

Builder: Collins and Maxwell, Easton

Alumni Hall of Engineering was built to house the various departments of engineering and was named after the many alumni who contributed to its cost.

Alumni Hall of Engineering


ALUMNI MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM (Renovated as Oeschle Hall – see below)

Location: East of Markle Hall, back from the corner of High and Hamilton Streets

Dates: Built in 1922-1924; north end swimming pool completed in 1925

Architect: Welles Bosworth, New York City

Builder: Charles McCaul, Contractors, Philadelphia

Alumni Memorial Gymnasium was built to increase the athletic facilities of the college and was named in memory of the alumni who died during World War I.

Oechsle Hall


BAILEY HEALTH CENTER

Location: Southwest corner of High and McCartney Streets

Dates: Built in 1974-75

Architect: Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, Philadelphia

Builder: Ray B. Bracy Construction, Allentown

Bailey Health Center was built as an outpatient clinic and infirmary to replace the Anna Robinson Pardee Infirmary. It was named in memory of Carolyn Huntington Bailey, wife of college trustee Ervin G. Bailey, who made a generous contribution toward the building.

Bailey Health Center


BLAIR HALL, OLD (no longer standing)

Location: Most western building of Dormitory Row; located on the north side of the Quad

Dates: Built 1866; renovated 1899-1900

Architect: Original architect unknown; renovation by Charles Webber Bolton, Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Blair Hall was the first building specifically designed to house students. It was named for John I. Blair, whose gift bought the land on which the residence hall was built. It was razed in 1963.

1867
1867

BLAIR HALL, NEW (No longer standing)

Location: Rear wing of Alumni Memorial Gymnasium, formerly the swimming pool

Dates: Built in 1925; redesigned in 1977

Architects: Welles Bosworth, New York City, as part of Alumni Memorial Gymnasium; redesigned by Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, architects, Philadelphia

Builders: Charles McCaul, Contractors, Philadelphia, in 1925; Turner Construction Co., Philadelphia, in 1977

Blair Hall was designed as student housing from the area that originally contained the swimming pool of Alumni Memorial Gymnasium. It was named for the former residence hall.

blair hall new


BOURGER VARSITY FOOTBALL HOUSE

Location: Fisher Field

Dates: Opened in 2007

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

This building includes locker rooms, offices, meeting rooms, and a sports medicine room, as well as strength and conditioning areas. The building was dedicated by John T. (Jack) Bourger ’71 and Selena Vanderwerf.

2007
2007

BRAINERD HALL see HOGG HALL


BUCK HALL/LANDIS CINEMA

Location: North Third Street

Dates: Dedicated in 2016

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Buck Hall was donated by William C. Buck ’50 and his wife Laura Buck. There is a black box theater in the building named after Daniel H. and Sandra Weiss. Additionally, there is a film-screening room entitled the Landis Cinema in honor of John W. Landis ’39 and Muriel T.S. Landis.

Buck Hall


CHATEAU CHAVANIAC

Location: On Paxinosa Ridge, north of the College.

Dates: Built in 1932-1935

Architect: Donald F. Innes, Wilkes-Barre, PA

Builder: Unknown

The Chateau was built as a private retreat by Allan P. Kirby ’15 and named after the birthplace of the Marquis de Lafayette. It was presented to the College by the F.M. Kirby Foundation in 1984.

1983
1983

COLTON CHAPEL

Location: South side of Quad

Dates: Built in 1916; renovated 1965-67; renovated 2016

Architect: Carrère & Hastings, New York City

Builder: F. L. Hoover & Sons, Philadelphia; 1965-67 renovation by Turner Construction Co., Philadelphia

Colton Chapel, the college chapel, was built with a gift from Mary R. Colton in memory of her husband John Milton Colton. The interior of the Chapel was gutted by fire in 1965. It was renovated and rededicated in 1967.

Architectural essay on Colton Chapel


CONWAY HOUSE (Formerly the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house)

Location: Four house quadrangle, Sullivan Lane

Dates: Built in 1963

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Conway House was generously donated to Lafayette on October 1, 1999 by Arthur W. Conway ’68 and William J. Conway ’70. The Conway house currently serves as a First-Year Community Engagement House for students. Previously, it served as the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house until it was closed in 1997 due to low membership.


DANA ENGINEERING LABORATORY

Location: North of Alumni Hall of Engineering

Dates: Built in 1912; renovated in 1982

Architect: Original architect unknown; renovation by Spillman Farmer Shoemaker Pell & Whildin, Bethlehem

Builder: Original builder unknown; renovation by R.J. Kroener, Eddington, Pennsylvania

Originally built for the mechanical engineering department in 1912, Dana Engineering Laboratory also housed the chemical and electrical engineering departments. In 1982, it was renovated and connected to Dana Hall of Engineering and Alumni Hall of Engineering. It was renamed the Eleanor Dana Engineering Laboratory after the wife of Charles A. Dana, whose Dana Foundation supported numerous campus projects.


DANA HALL OF ENGINEERING

Location: East end of Alumni Hall of Engineering

Dates: Built in 1964-66

Architect: Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, Philadelphia

Builder: Turner Construction Co., Philadelphia

Dana Hall of Engineering was built as an addition to Alumni Hall of Engineering, and was named for major contributor Charles A. Dana.

Dana Hall of Engineering


DELTA DELTA DELTA HOUSE (Formerly the Delta Tau Delta Fraternity House)

Location: Two West Campus, behind Marquis Hall

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

This building formerly housed members of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity until a 1988 disciplinary action. Today it houses members of the Delta Delta Delta sorority on campus.

Delta Delta Delta House
2015

DELTA GAMMA HOUSE (a.k.a. Hamilton House, Formerly the Alpha Chi Rho fraternity house)

Location: 718 Hamilton Street

Dates: Built in 1919

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Located on 718 Hamilton Street, the building was formerly the house of the Alpha Chi Rho fraternity until they moved to Sullivan Lane (presently the home of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority). Members of the DG sorority now occupy Hamilton House.

DG House


DELTA KAPPA EPSILON HOUSE (old)

Location: March Field

Dates: Built in 1903, destroyed by fire in 1959

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Delta Kappa Epsilon House housed the members of the DKE fraternity on campus. The house was is located on March field next to the Phi Kappa Psi House.

DKE House old


DELTA KAPPA EPSILON HOUSE (new)

Location: March Field

Dates: Built in 1961-62, renovated in 2015

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Delta Kappa Epsilon House houses the members of the DKE fraternity on campus and is now located on March field next to the Phi Kappa Psi House.

2015
2015

DELTA UPSILON HOUSE (Formerly the Sigma Chi fraternity house and PT Farinon House)

Location: Four house quadrangle, Sullivan Lane

Dates: Built in 1963

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Delta Upsilon house provides housing for the members of the DU fraternity on campus. It was formerly the Sigma Chi fraternity house until it was closed in 1988 due to a disciplinary action. It then served as the PT Farinon House dormitory until it became the DU house.

Delta Upsilon Old


EAST HALL (no longer standing)

Location: Northeastern corner of campus, present site of Gates Hall

Dates: Built in 1873-74

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

East Hall was a student residence hall. It was razed in 1930 to make way for Gates Hall.

East Hall


EASTON HALL

Location: Southwest edge of campus, overlooking Easton

Dates: Built in 1925-26; renovated in 1966

Architects: Thomas Martin & Kirkpatrick, Philadelphia, assisted by A.D. Chidsey, Easton, and Day & Klauder, Philadelphia; renovations by Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, Philadelphia

Builder: Bechtel & Bechtel, Easton

Easton Hall is a student residence hall, built as the Centennial gift to the College by the citizens of Easton.

1926
1926

FARBER HALL

Location : North end of March Field, west of Kunkel Hall

Dates: Built in 1978

Architect: Spillman Farmer Shoemaker Pell & Whildin, Bethlehem

Builder: Ehret Inc., Wilmington, DE

Farber Hall is a student residence hall. It was named in memory of Charles D. Farber ’65, whose parents, Jack Farber ’31 and his wife, contributed to its construction.

Farber Hall


FARINON COLLEGE CENTER

Location: On the east side of the Quad, next to Hogg Hall

Dates: Built in 1990-91

Architect: Shepley Bulfinch Richardson & Abbott Inc., Boston

Builder: Irwin & Leighton, Philadelphia

Home of student activities, dining services, and the bookstore, the Farinon College Center is named for William B. Farinon ’39 and his wife P T Farinon, who made possible its construction.

Architectural essay on Farinon Center

Farinon College Center


FAYERWEATHER HALL (no longer standing)

Location: On Dorm Row, north side of the Quad

Dates: Built in 1899-1900

Architect: Charles Webber Bolton Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Fayerweather Hall was a student residence hall, built as a link between two existing residences, Martien and Powel Halls, and was named for Daniel B. Fayerweather. It was razed in 1949.

Fayerweather, martien, and powel halls


FEATHER HOUSE (Formerly the Fretz House)

Location: 17 Cattell Street

Dates: Built in 1880

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Originally known as “Hill Crest,” Feather House was built in 1880 as a private residence by Joseph K.S. Rodenbough, father-in-law of Dr. John Edgar Fretz, Class of 1893. Dr. Fretz was a prominent Easton physician and College physician from 1914 to 1919. The Fretz family lived in the house until 1959, when Fretz’s daughter, Emily Fretz Starr, sold the house to the College. The College named it the Fretz House and it served as the Department of Military Science until ROTC was discontinued in 1991. In 1991, the Fretz House became the History department. In 2006, Ramer History House was opened and the Fretz House was re-purposed as the Feather House of the Communications Division. The Feather House was dedicated on November 9, 2010 in honor of Jeffrey P. Feather ’65 and Grace Kathryn Feather.

Fretz House


FISHER STADIUM

Location: North of Markle Hall

Dates: Built in 1926

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Edwards-Dunn, contractor

Fisher Field is the main campus athletic stadium. It is named for trustee Thomas Fisher, Class of 1888, who donated a quarter of the cost and personally raised the balance. Planning and engineering supervision was provided by trustee Horace C. Booz, Class of 1895.


FISHER HALL EAST

Location: Sullivan Lane Residential Village

Dates: Built in 2005

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Fisher Hall East is a suite style dormitory that houses 162 upperclassmen, primarily seniors.

Fisher Hall East 2017
2017

FISHER HALL WEST

Location: Sullivan Lane Residential Village

Dates: Built in 2005

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Fisher Hall West is a suite style dormitory that houses 162 upperclassmen, primarily seniors.

2017
2017

GATES HALL

Location: Eastern edge of campus, on McCartney Street

Dates: Built in 1930-31

Architect: Charles Z. Klauder, Philadelphia, and A.D. Chidsey, Jr., Easton

Builder: Henry E. Baton, Philadelphia

Gates Hall replaced East Hall as a student residence, and was named for trustee Leslie F. Gates, Class of 1897.

Gates Hall


GAYLEY HALL (no longer standing)

Location: On Sullivan Lane, on present site of Skillman Library

Dates: Built in 1902

Architect: Charles Webber Bolton, Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Gayley Hall was built with funding provided by trustee James Gayley, Class of 1876. It was an instruction building for the chemistry and metallurgy departments. It was torn down in the early 1960’s to make way for Skillman Library.

Gayley Hall


GREEN OBSERVATORY (no longer standing)

Location: Originally on site of Colton Chapel, then moved to site of Markle Hall in 1914

Dates: Built in 1864

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Traill Green Observatory, known as the “Star Barn,” was built by Lafayette faculty member and trustee, Dr. Traill Green to house a telescope he had donated to the college. It also served during the early 1920s as the headquarters of the R.O.T.C. The Observatory was torn down in 1929 to make way for Markle Hall, and its stones used to build the gateway at the entrance to the steps leading up to the college from Third Street, a gift from the Class of 1929.

1904
1904

GROSSMAN INTERNATIONAL HOUSE (Formerly the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity house)

Location: East campus, besides Soles Hall

Dates: Built in 1915; renovated in 2011-12; dedicated on April 5, 2013

Architect: Apicella+Bunton Architects LLC of New Haven, Conn.

Builder: Miller, Miller, & McLachlan Construction Inc. of Northampton, Pa

This house was occupied by the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity until it was closed in 2010 due to a disciplinary action. Donated by Richard Grossman ’64 and his wife Rissa, the house was renovated in 2011 and became a living group for students with global perspectives. On June 1, 2013 the Grossman House was awarded the LEED-CI Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.

2012
2012

GYMNASIUM, OLD (no longer standing)

Location: On present site of Kirby Hall of Civil Rights, on Sullivan Road across from March Field

Dates: Built in 1884

Architect: Adaptation of plans of Peter J. Williamson

Builder: Unknown

The Gymnasium, built adjacent to March Field where athletic competitions were held, was built using the plans of the gymnasium at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. After the Alumni Memorial Gymnasium was built in 1924, the old gym became the headquarters of the R.O.T.C. It was razed in 1929 to be replaced by Kirby Hall of Civil Rights.

1900
1900

HILLEL HOUSE

Location: 524 Clinton Terrace

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Hillel House was dedicated on October 25, 2002 along with the Pesky Family Chapel and the Lee D. Pesky ’87 Torah School. The Hillel House sponsors religious, cultural, and social events by the Hillel Society that are open to the entire Lafayette community. The Hillel society has weekly Shabbat dinners along with occasional bagel brunches, music groups, national speakers as well as holiday celebrations.

Hillel House


HOGG HALL (Formerly called Brainerd Hall)

Location: East end of Quad

Dates: Built in 1902

Architect: Charles Webber Bolton, Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Hogg Hall was presented by James Renwick Hogg, Class of 1878, as a home for the Brainerd Society. It was designed as a religious center for the college, but also as a social center, with bowling alleys, billiard tables, and reading rooms. Originally called Brainerd Hall, the name was changed in 1944 to honor its donor.

Architectural essay on Hogg Hall

Hogg Hall


HUGEL SCIENCE CENTER (Formerly part of Olin Hall of Science)

Location: Sullivan Lane

Dates: Dedicated on June 1, 2001

Architect: Ellenzweig Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA

Builder: Barclay White, Skanska, Inc., Blue Bell PA

Project Manager: Bovis Lend Lease, Inc. Princeton NJ

The Hugel Science Center was dedicated on June 1, 2001 and named after Charles E. Hugel ’51. The Science Center was created through and addition and renovation of the Olin Hall of Science which was dedicated in 1957. The center is an academic building with lecture halls for chemistry and physics along with lab rooms, research rooms, and faculty offices.

2009
2009

JENKS HALL see SIMON CENTER FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS


KAMINE HALL

Location: Sullivan Lane Residential Village

Dates: Built in 2005

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Kamine Hall is a dormitory that houses 90 first-year students. The building has air conditioning, kitchens, and an elevator. The dining service, Simon’s Cafe, is also located on the ground floor of Kamine Hall.


KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA HOUSE (a.k.a. Lerch House, Formerly the Alphi Chi Rho fraternity house and the International Programs Center)

Location: Sullivan Lane

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Kappa Kappa Gamma House was originally the home of the Alpha Chi Rho Fraternity until it was closed in 1985 due to low membership. In 1986, it became the Lerch House International Programs Center (IPC) for a brief time. Today, Lerch House is the home of the KKG sorority on campus.

2012
2012

 


KEEFE HALL

Location: South College Drive

Dates: Dedicated on October 22, 1999

Architect: Einhorn Taffee Prescott

Builder: Telesis Construction Company

Keefe Hall was dedicated on October 22, 1999 by Harry Victor Keefe, Jr. The building serves as a dormitory for 117 male and female students. Keefe Hall has seven different living units that accommodates special-interest groups/ each unit includes a lounge and a kitchen area.

Keefe Hall


KIRBY FIELD HOUSE

Location: North side of campus, on corner of Pierce and Hamilton Streets

Dates: Built in 1973

Architect: Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, Philadelphia

Builder: Irwin & Leighton, Philadelphia

The Field House was named for trustee Allan P. Kirby ’15, a major College benefactor. The building also contains a pool complex, named the Ruef Natatorium after John W. Ruef ’01.

Kirby Field House


KIRBY HALL OF CIVIL RIGHTS

Location: On Sullivan Lane across from March Field

Dates: Built in 1929-1930

Architect: Whitney Warren, New York City

Builder: James Stewart & Co., New York City

Kirby Hall of Civil Rights was built by trustee Fred Morgan Kirby, to house the department of government and law, a government and law library, and a political science museum.

Architectual essay on Kirby Hall

Kirby Hall of Civil Rights


KIRBY HOUSE

Location: Across from Alumni Memorial Gymnasium at the intersection of High and Hamilton Streets

Dates: Built in 1949-50

Architect: Donald F. Innes, Wilkes Barre, PA

Builder: H.E. Stoudt Construction Co., Allentown

Jesse A. Kirby House is a student social residence. It was donated by Allan P. Kirby ’15 in memory of his mother.

Kirby House


KIRBY SPORTS CENTER (Formerly Kirby Field House)

Location: North side of campus, on corner of Pierce and Hamilton Streets

Dates: Dedicated on June 2, 2000

Architect: Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott, Boston MA

Builder: Warfel Construction Company, Lancaster PA

Project Management: Bovis Lend Lease, Inc. Philadelphia, PA

Sports Architecture and Engineering: Cannon Design, Boston MA

Civil Engineer: Cheery, Weber & Associates, Phillipsburg,

Kirby Sports Center was previously the Allan P. Kirby Field House (1973). The building was renovated and dedicated as the Kirby Sports Center on June 2, 2000. The center was in honor of Allan P. Kirby ’15 and dedicated by his son Fred M. Kirby II ’42. The Kirby Sports center includes a fitness center, gymnasium, swimming pool, jogging track, racquet courts, rock climbing wall, locker rooms, exercise class rooms, as well as offices. In 2016 the pool complex was renovated and rededicated as the Weinstein Natatorium, thanks to a major gift from Mike Weinstein ’70 and his wife, Jill.

2012
2012

KNOX HALL (no longer standing)

Location: On Dorm Row, north side of the Quad

Dates: Built in 1899-1900

Architect: Charles Webber Bolton, Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Knox Hall was a student residence hall, built as a link between two existing residences, Newkirk Hall and Blair Hall, to form one large residence for students. It was named for Lafayette president James Hall Mason Knox. It was razed in 1963.

Knox and Newkirk Halls


KUNKEL HALL

Location: On Sullivan Lane, north of March Field, across from Phi Delta Theta

Dates: Built in 1969

Architect: Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, Philadelphia

Builder: Wark and Company, Philadelphia

Kunkel Hall was built to house the biology department, and was named for Beverly W. Kunkel, a member of the biology faculty from 1915 to 1952.

Kunkel Hall


MARKLE HALL

Location: North of High Street, opposite the Quad

Dates: Built in 1929

Architect: Charles Z. Klauder, Philadelphia

Contractor: Breig Brothers, Scranton, PA

Originally the John Markle Hall of Mining Engineering, the building also housed the departments of metallurgy and geology. It became the Markle Administration Building in 1964. It was named for the donor, trustee John Markle, Class of 1880.

Markle Hall


MARQUIS HALL

Location: On Sullivan Lane, opposite March Field

Dates: Built in 1960

Architect: Donald F. Innes, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, was the original architect. He died during construction of the building; Everett Associates, Allentown, finished the project as architect and contractor.

Builder: Sordoni Construction Co., Forty Fort, PA

Marquis Hall was built to contain dining facilities, a student center, and student housing.

Marquis Hall


MARTIEN HALL (no longer standing)

Location: Part of Dorm Row, north side of Quad

Dates: Built in 1868-69; renovated 1899-1900

Architect: Original architect unknown; renovation by Charles Webber Bolton, Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Martien Hall was a student residence hall, named for trustee Alfred Martien. It was razed in 1949.

Fayerweather, martien, and powel halls


McCRACKEN VARSITY HOUSE

Location: On Metzgar Field, north of campus in Forks Township

Dates: Built in 1969-70

Architect: Richard Hawley Cutting, Cleveland, OH

Builder: Collins and Maxwell, Easton

McCracken Varsity House is a sports service facility, containing offices, lockers and storage. It was named for former football coach and trustee, G. Herbert McCracken, and his wife, Helen K. McCracken.

McCracken Varsity House


McKEEN HALL, OLD (no longer standing)

Location: Part of Dorm Row, north side of Quad

Dates: Built in 1871

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

McKeen Hall was a student residence, named for trustee Thomas L. McKeen, whose heirs contributed the construction costs. It was demolished in 1957.

McKeen Hall Old


McKEEN HALL, NEW

Location: On McCartney Street, east border of campus

Dates: Built in 1955

Architect: Donald F. Innes, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

Builder: Irvin & Leighton, Philadelphia

McKeen is a student residence hall named for Old McKeen Hall.

McKeen Hall New


McKELVY HOUSE

Location: 200 High Street

Dates: Built in 1888

Architect: McKim, Mead and White, New York City

Builder: Unknown

Originally known as “Oakhurst”, McKelvy House was built for John Eyerman, who was a faculty lecturer in mineralogy at Lafayette from 1888 to 1891. It was bought by Francis G. McKelvy, a trustee of the college, and donated to the college by his heirs in 1960. It is used as a college scholars’ residence.

Architectural essay on McKelvy House

1983
1983

NEWKIRK HALL (no longer standing)

Location: Part of Dorm Row, on north side of Quad

Dates: Built in 1868-69; renovated 1899-1900

Architect: Original architect unknown; renovation by Charles Webber Bolton, Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Newkirk Hall was a student residence. It was named in honor of Matthew Newkirk, a trustee of the original Manual Labor School in Germantown that became Lafayette. It was razed in 1963.

Knox and Newkirk Halls


NEWMAN HOUSE

Location: 119 McCartney Street

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

It is home to the Newman Association, a Catholic Organization, and is a place where students explore their personal interests while being united by their faith.

Newman House


NORTH HALL

Location: North of Watson Hall and Alumni Hall of Engineering

Dates: Built in 1917

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

North Hall was a “temporary” barracks from World War I, which was used for maintenance and storage in the 1920s and 1930s then as a mess hall in World War II. It was renovated for use by the R.O.T.C in 1950, and finally used again for maintenance in the 1960s and 1970s, until it was replaced by the present Plant Operations Building.

North Hall


OECHSLE CENTER FOR GLOBAL EDUCATION

Location: Behind Pardee Hall at the base of the hill/

Dates: Built in 2014; Dedicated on March 27, 2015

Architect: GUND Partnership, Cambridge, MA

Builder: Unknown

The Oechsle Center for Global Education houses the International Affairs department as well as the department of Anthropology and Sociology. It was donated by Walter Oechsle ’57 and the late Christa Huber Oechsle.

2015
2015

OECHSLE HALL (Formerly the Alumni Memorial Gymnasium)

Location: East of Markle Hall, back from the corner of High and Hamilton Streets

Dates: Built in 1922-24; renovated and rededicated as Oeschle Hall on October 18, 2002

Renovation Architect: RTKL Associates, Inc, Baltimore, MD

Renovation Builder: Telesis Construction Inc, King of Prussia, PA

Previously the Alumni Memorial Gymnasium, Oechsle Hall was donated by Walter Oechsle ’57 and his wife Christa on October 18, 2002. It houses the Psychology department and the Neuroscience program.


OLIN HALL OF SCIENCE

Location: West of Sullivan Lane, across from Alumni Hall of Engineering

Dates: Built in 1956-57

Architect: Rogers and Butler, of New York City

Builder: Irwin & Leighton of Philadelphia

Olin Hall of Science was built to house the chemistry, physics, math and graphics departments. It was presented by the Olin Foundation in memory of Franklin W. Olin.

Olin Hall of Science


ORD STEAM HEATING PLANT

Location: North end of campus, north of Dana Engineering Hall

Dates: Built in 1948

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Ord Heating Plant was built with funds left to the college by William D. Ord, Class of 1887. Its coal-fired steam plant was procured from navy war surplus by Captain Algert D. Alexis ’19.

Ord Steam Heating Plant


PARDEE HALL

Location: On south side of Quad

Dates: Built in 1871; rebuilt 1879 and 1897; renovated 1964-65

Architect: John McArthur, Jr., Philadelphia; renovation by Everett Associates, Allentown

Builder: Lewis Havens, Philadelphia; renovation by Turner Construction Co., Philadelphia

Pardee Hall was originally built with funds donated by Ario Pardee to house the Pardee scientific department, but it has also housed the college administration and other academic departments. The building burned in June 1879, was rebuilt within 18 months and rededicated in 1880. It burned again in 1897, and was rebuilt by May 1899. It was completely renovated in 1964-65.

Architectural essay on Pardee Hall

1890s
1890s

 


PARDEE INFIRMARY see SULLIVAN HOUSE


PFENNING ALUMNI CENTER

Location: Behind Oeschle Hall on Hamilton Street

Dates: Built in 2002

Architect: RTKL Associates, Inc, Baltimore, MD

Builder: Telesis Construction, Inc, King of Prussia, PA

The Pfenning Alumni Center was donated by Robert E. ’32 and Hazel E. Pfenning. The building was dedicated on September 14, 2002. The center is a home for visiting alumni on campus.

2002
2002

PI BETA PHI HOUSE (Formerly the Kappa Sigma fraternity and the Sigma Kappa sorority)

Location: Sullivan Lane quadrangle

Dates: Built in 1963

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Home of the Pi Beta Phi sorority.

SONY DSC


PHI KAPPA PSI HOUSE

Location: March Field (relocated on July 1, 1971)

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Phi Kappa Psi House was originally located on the north end of Skillman Library. It was relocated to March Field on July 1, 1971.


PLANT OPERATIONS BUILDING

Location: On site of North Hall, north of Watson Hall

Dates: Built in 1981

Architect: Spillman Farmer Shoemaker Pell & Whildin, Bethlehem

Builder: Walker Eby Construction, Allentown

The Plant Operations Building replaced North Hall and contains the operations of the physical plant on campus.

Plant Operations


PORTLOCK BLACK CULTURAL CENTER

Location: 101 McCartney Street

Dates: Renovated and dedicated in 1999

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The Portlock Black Cultural Center was founded in 1970 by the College’s former academic dead David A. Portlock. It was originally located on the Quad where the Farinon College Center is now located The current building was renovated and newly dedicated in 1999. The Center provides educational and social experience for students of color. The center works to spread cultural awareness around campus. The black Cultural Center hosts events and also contains offices.


POWEL HALL (no longer standing)

Location: Part of Dorm Row, on north side of Quad

Dates: Built in 1868-69; renovated 1899-1900

Architect: Original architect unknown; renovation by Charles Webber Bolton, Class of 1880, Philadelphia

Builder: Unknown

Powel Hall was a student residence, which was named for John Hare Powel, one of Lafayette’s charter trustees. It was razed in 1949.

Fayerweather, martien, and powel halls


PRESIDENT’S HOUSE

Location: On the corner of Cattell Street and McCartney Street.

Dates: Built in 1867

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

The President’s House was built as a personal residence by President William C. Cattell. In 1884, John I. Blair bought the house and presented it to the college as a residence for the college president.

1904
1904

RAMER HALL

Location: West of March Field, next to Farber Hall

Dates: Built in 1991

Architect: Spillman Farmer Shoemaker Pell & Whildin of Bethlehem

Builder: Alvin H. Butz Inc., Allentown

Ramer Hall is a student residence hall. It is named for trustee Lawrence J. Ramer ’50 and his wife, Ina Lee Brown Ramer, who made possible its construction.

2011
2011

RAMER HISTORY HOUSE (Formerly the Theta Delta Chi fraternity house)

Location: West campus, next to Kirby Hall of Civil Rights

Dates: Renovated and dedicated in 2006

Architect: KKS Architects

Builder: Miller, Miller, & McLachlan Construction

The Ramer History house renovations were completed in 2006 and is the home of the History Department. Funds for the renovation were donated by Lawrence J. Ramer ’50 Hon. D. ’92 and Ina Lee Ramer.


REEDER HOUSE

Location: 225 Reeder Street

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Originally called the Reeder Street Scholars House, the Reeder House contains a group of Lafayette students called Reeder Street Fellows. These students represent a diverse number of majors and backgrounds. They host events and promote personal and intellectual growth throughout campus.

Reeder House


REFECTORY (no longer standing)

Location: In the area bounded by Van Wickle, Kirby Hall and Phi Delta Theta

Dates: Built in 1834

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Originally a shop for the mechanical part of the manual training program during the college’s first decade, it was built by Lafayette students under the supervision of President George Junkin. It became the refectory when manual labor was dropped in 1839. It was razed in 1872.


RUBIN HALL

Location: Sullivan Lane Residential Village

Dates: Built in 2005

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Rubin hall is a student dormitory that houses 59 students. It contains lounges, kitchens, laundry services.

2017
2017

RUEF HALL

Location: South of the west wing of South Hall, east of Easton Hall

Dates: Built in 1965-66

Architect: Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, of Philadelphia

Builder: Turner Construction Co., Philadelphia

Ruef Hall was built as a student residence, and named for John W. Ruef ’01. It housed the first female students when the College went coed in 1970.

Ruef Hall


SCOTT HALL (Formerly the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house)

Location: Behind Van Wickle Hall on Sullivan Lane

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

This building housed the PDT fraternity until it was closed in 1993 due to disciplinary action. In 2011 the building was renovated to create an engaging learning environment for the community while maintaining the building’s Georgian Revival style, integrating technology, and creating areas for interaction for students and faculty. Scott Hall currently houses the Office of the Dean of the College, which administer programs that support students’ academic success. In addition, the office coordinates the study-abroad program and assists students who have an interest in pursuing careers in the legal or health professions. The building also houses the Center for the Integration of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship (CITLS).


WILLIAM E. SIMON CENTER FOR ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS (Formerly Jenks Hall)

Location: Southern edge of campus, on bluff overlooking Easton

Dates: Built in 1865; renovated in 1986

Architect: John McArthur, Jr., Philadelphia; renovation by Spillman Farmer Shoemaker Pell & Whildin, Bethlehem

Builder: Original builder unknown; renovation by Nedco Construction Co., Trexlertown, Pennsylvania

Jenks Hall, which is now part of the Simon Center, was built in 1865 as a hall of chemistry. It was named for trustee Barton H. Jenks, who contributed the costs of its construction. When Gayley Hall was built in 1901, Jenks became the home of the biology department. After biology moved to Kunkel Hall in 1969, Jenks housed the art and music departments. In 1986, it was renovated and merged with the old steam plant next door to become the William E. Simon Center for Economics and Business. The Center was named for trustee William E. Simon ’52, its major benefactor.

William E Simon Center


SKILLMAN LIBRARY

Location: On the west side of the Quad

Dates: Built in 1963; renovated and north wing added 1986-87; renovated and expanded in 2004

Architects: Vincent Kling, Philadelphia; 1986-86 renovation and wing by Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott, Inc., Boston; 2004 renovation by Ann Beha Architects

Builder: Turner Construction Co., New York; 1986-87 renovation by Irwin & Leighton, Philadelphia

Skillman Library is the main college library, built to replace Van Wickle Library. It is named for long-time secretary of the Board of Trustees, David Bishop Skillman. The north wing was funded by and named for William E. Simon ’52 and Carol G. Simon.

Architectural essay on Skillman Library, Simon Wing


SOLES HALL

Location: On northeast end of campus, between Gates Hall and Hogg Hall

Dates: Built in 1949

Architect: Donald Innes, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

Builder: Unknown

Soles Hall was built as a student social residence hall It was donated by trustee T. Franklin Soles ’04.

Soles Hall


SOUTH COLLEGE

Location: On southern part of campus, south of Van Wickle Hall.

Dates: Built in 1833-34; wings added 1869 and 1873; center rebuilt 1961-62

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

South College, the original college edifice, was designed by President George Junkin. It was built in 1833-34 with Junkin serving as general contractor, doing much of the work himself with the aid of the students. The east wing was added in 1866-69 and was originally used as the college library. The wing was first called Eastonian Hall to honor the citizens of Easton, who provided the funds for its construction. The west wing, added in 1871-73, was designed by architect M.S. Morrill. It served as the chapel until Colton Chapel was built in 1916, and as a mess hall for Camp Lafayette during World War I. It was renovated in 1920-21. After a fire destroyed a large part of the west wing in March 1956, it was restored in 1956-57. In 1958, the east wing was renovated by Collins &Maxwell, Easton. The original central section was renovated in 1869 and 1907, and then was razed in 1961. Everett Associates, Allentown, designed the new section which was constructed in 1961-62. Over the years, South College has had many functions and currently serves as a residence hall. In 2001, the west wing was renovated and renamed Jesser Hall,dedicated to Ned ’39 and Ruth Jesser.

1881
1881

SULLIVAN HOUSE (no longer standing)

Location: At the southwestern edge of campus, on Sullivan Lane

Dates: Unknown

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Sullivan House was originally the college student infirmary, which was established in 1928 in an existing building bought by the college and endowed by Israel P. Pardee, Class of 1874. It was named the Anna Robison Pardee Infirmary for Israel Pardee’s mother. Over the years Sullivan House became the home of first the Sigma Kappa and and then the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority until it was razed to make way for the construction of new dormitories.

Sullivan House


SULLIVAN VILLAGE (no longer standing)

Location: Southwest end of campus, west of Sullivan Lane.

Dates: Built in 1948

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Sullivan Village was a community of temporary housing units for married veterans and their families who attended the college after World War II under the G.I. Bill. Designed and built by the U.S. Public Housing Agency, it was composed of two sections. One, called Vet Village, had 38 units, and was located on the site presently occupied by the tennis courts and parking lot on the south end of Sullivan Lane. The other section, called Passion Flats, had 44 units on March Field.

veteran-dorm_001
1946
Sullivan Village Map, ca. 1948
Sullivan Village Map, ca. 1948

“THE SPOT”

Location: 300 North Third Street

Dates: Purchased by Lafayette in 2006

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Previously owned by the Jac & Company Restaurant, the building was sold to Lafayette on March 17th, 2006. Lafayette converted the first floor of the building into a social club for students called “The Spot.”

2012
2012

VAN WICKLE HALL

Location: South of Skillman Library, next to Colton Chapel

Dates: Built in 1899-1900; additions in 1913 and 1939; renovation in 1963

Architect: John McArthur Harris, Philadelphia; 1939 addition by Frank Boeshore, Philadelphia; 1963 renovation by Pharo & Haas, Bethlehem

Builder: Original builder unknown; 1939 addition by Henry E. Baton, Philadelphia

Originally called Van Wickle Memorial Library, it was named for Augustus S. Van Wickle, whose will had provided for a college library. A stack room was added in 1913 with funding from Van Wickle’s daughter, Marjorie Van Wickle Lyon. In 1939, two wings were added, a larger wing on the north to increase stack capacity and study facilities, and a smaller west wing, which contained a reconstruction of the library of Fred Morgan Kirby from his Wilkes-Barre home, donated by Allan P. Kirby ’15. With the construction of Skillman Library in 1963, Van Wickle was renovated to become the home of the geology department.

Architectural essay on Van Wickle Hall

Van Wickle Hall


WATSON COURTS

Location: East of Pardee Hall, on McCartney Street and Clinton Terrace

Dates: Built in 1972

Architect: Harbeson Hough Livingston & Larson, Philadelphia

Builder: R.C Ballinger Co., Wynnewood, Pennsylvania

The Jeannette Kittredge Watson Courts are apartments for student residence. They are a memorial to the wife of trustee and benefactor Thomas J. Watson.

Watson Courts


WATSON HALL (Formerly Watson Hall of International Affairs)

Location: West of Olin Hall and Alumni Hall of Engineering

Dates: Built in 1949; north wing added in 1956; south wing added in 1964

Architect: Donald Innes, Wilkes Barre Pennsylvania; south wing by Everett Associates, Allentown

Builder: Collins and Maxwell, Easton

Watson Hall was built as a school of international affairs, with student housing, classrooms, library and offices. It was dedicated on October 22, 1949 and was donated by trustee Thomas J. Watson and his wife. For a time it was the home of the Public Information Office and a student residence hall. At present it exclusively houses students.

Watson Hall


WEST COLLEGE (no longer standing)

Location: South of Kirby Hall of Civil Rights

Dates: Built in 1838

Architect: Unknown

Builder: Unknown

Originally called the Model School, it was built by President George Junkin to house the first school of practice, or teacher training school, in the United States. Over the years it served as a lecture hall, student residence and administration building. It was remodeled in 1873 and demolished after an extensive fire in 1953.

West College


WILLIAMS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Location: Northeast corner of Hamilton and High Streets

Dates: Built in 1983

Architect: Perkins & Will, Washington, D.C.

Builders: Irwin & Leighton, Philadelphia

The Morris R. Williams Center for the Arts is the college cultural center. It contains the departments of art and music, as well as theaters for the performing arts and an art gallery. It was the gift of Morris R. Williams ’22 and Josephine C. Williams.

Williams Center For the Arts 1983
1983

WILLIAMS VISUAL ARTS BUILDING

Location: corner of North Third Street Arts Campus

Dates: Construction began in August 1999 and the building was dedicated on April 24, 2001

Architect: Joseph N. Biondo Architects, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. and Werner A. Buckl and Associates, Easton, Pa.

Builder: Miller, Miller, & McLachlan, North Whitehall Township, Pa.

Mechanical Engineering Firm: Rodgers Associates, PC, Wilkes-Barre, Pa

Donated by Morris R Williams ’22 and his wife Josephine, the Williams Visual Arts Building was completed and dedicated on April 24, 2001. The visual arts center serves as a workplace and resource center where students receive the skills necessary for successful careers in the arts. The WVAB is also home to the Grossman Gallery and the Community-Based Teaching Program.

2013
2013