Fluids are Cool Gallery – some past submissions

A collection of original photos depicting the science, beauty, and power of fluids

Poetry by Sarah Walko ’15:

Water, when it flows
Can be viscous, turbulent
Delicate, one knows

Ripples and turbulent flow at the water surface aerate the water for the goldfish - submitted by Lauren Onatzevitch

Ripples and turbulent flow at the water surface aerate the water for the goldfish
– submitted by Lauren Onatzevitch

CE juniors doing some kind of rain dance in front of a dam that is experiencing hydrostatic pressure forces - submitted by

CE juniors doing some kind of rain dance in front of a dam that is experiencing hydrostatic pressure forces – submitted by Kelly Hogan

Stormwater flowing from a drainage pipe. Leaves. - submitted by Morgan Biddle

Stormwater flowing from a drainage pipe. Leaves. – submitted by Morgan Biddle

Bleck - Oobleck's shear strength and viscosity increase when the fluid is agitated. It also makes a large mess when poured on a table. - submitted by  Louis Papsdorf

Bleck – Oobleck’s shear strength and viscosity increase when the fluid is agitated. It also makes a large mess when poured on a table. – submitted by Louis Papsdorf

the original Oobleck

the original Oobleck

A 120 degree V-notch weir - for measuring open channel flows. - submitted by Sasha Gorski

A 120 degree V-notch weir – for measuring open channel flows. – submitted by Sasha Gorski

The Niagara River and Niagara Falls, Oct 9, 2016. Avg flow is about 20,000 cfs  - submitted by Jenna Didio

The Niagara River and Niagara Falls, Oct 9, 2016. Avg flow is about 20,000 cfs – submitted by Jenna Didio

Multiphase flow (oily sheen) in runoff near Bailey Health Center  - submitted by James Roberts

Multiphase flow (oily sheen) in runoff near Bailey Health Center – submitted by James Roberts

Turbulence and aeration in a small stream near the Delaware Canal - submitted by Colin Lenskold

Turbulence and aeration in a small stream near the Delaware Canal – submitted by Colin Lenskold

Experimental brewing system at Weyerbacher brewery in Easton - pipes, valves, pumps, gages, controls...the works. Submitted by Jack Hillman

Experimental brewing system at Weyerbacher brewery in Easton – pipes, valves, pumps, gages, controls…the works. Submitted by Jack Hillman

DaVinci does drag. Streamlines around various objects under laminar and turbulent flow. Submitted by Lauren Onatzevitch

DaVinci does drag. Streamlines around various objects under laminar and turbulent flow. Original work by Lauren Onatzevitch

Manometers used to indicate degree of fermentation in a winery. As CO2 is formed the manometer fluid is pushed to the right - submitted by Colin Lenskold

Manometers used to indicate degree of fermentation in a winery. As CO2 is formed the manometer fluid is pushed to the right – submitted by Colin Lenskold

Acrylic painting of turbulent flow around a sphere - by Laura Strang

Acrylic painting of turbulent flow around a sphere – original work by Laura Strang

Turbulent wake behind a leaf in campus runoff. Submitted by Ziqi Chen

Turbulent wake behind a leaf in campus runoff. Submitted by Ziqi Chen

Collage illustrating the beauty of fluid flows. Submitted by Merinda Hansen-Kemp

Collage illustrating the beauty of fluid flows. Submitted by Merinda Hansen-Kemp

Water pouring into an outlet structure (view from inside) - submitted by Emily Maj

Water pouring into an outlet structure (the view from inside) – submitted by Emily Maj

Contemplating Bernoulli's principle over Arizona - submitted by Emily Maj

Contemplating Bernoulli’s principle over Arizona – submitted by Emily Maj

Waterfalls at Child's Park in the Delaware Water Gap - submitted by Kelly Hogan

Waterfalls at Child’s Park in the Delaware Water Gap – submitted by Kelly Hogan

Turbulent flow & surface tension - submitted by Sarah Walko '15

Turbulent flow & surface tension in flow over granite – submitted by Sarah Walko ’15

surface tension effects just after impact - submitted by Sarah Walko '15

Surface tension and wave effects on the surface just after impact – submitted by Sarah Walko ’15

Winter surfing in Munich - turbulent flow in a standing wave aka "hydraulic jump"

Winter surfing in Munich – turbulent flow in a standing wave (aka “hydraulic jump”) just below the flow constriction – submitted by Emily Crossette ’15

Wuxu Lake, China. Submitted by Zili Wang '15

Wuxu Lake, China – submitted by Zili Wang ’15

Waves in the water surface caused by vibration of the glass - submitted by Michael Ryan '15

Waves in the water surface caused by vibration of the glass – submitted by Michael Ryan ’15

its Turbulence (on the right) NOT turbidity (on the left) - submitted by Leikune Aragaw '15

its Turbulence (on the right) NOT turbidity (on the left) – submitted by Leikune Aragaw ’15

Masonry dam, Lake Champion, Catskills - conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy - submitted by Stacey-Ann Pearson '15

Masonry dam, Lake Champion, Catskills – conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy – submitted by Stacey-Ann Pearson ’15

Waves in sheet flow down Sullivan Road - submitted by Andrew Burnett '15

Waves in sheet flow down Sullivan Road – submitted by Andrew Burnett ’15

Turbulent wake behind a leaf - submitted by Ashley Bohnenberger '15

Turbulent wake behind a leaf – submitted by Ashley Bohnenberger ’15


The Lehigh River joins the Delaware in Easton. Flow accelerates smoothly over the dam and then there is a hydraulic jump at the bottom - submitted by Jake Dein 2012

Turbulent wake behind a plunging bottle cap - submitted by Ekrem Bermek 2012

Eddies in turbulent open channel flow, Stevens State Park - submitted by Emily Clark 2012

Swirling patterns in condensation droplets on a window - very cool! - submitted by Kelsey Lantz 2013

Wake, turbulence, and buoyancy behind a powerboat - submitted by Katie Ownes 2012

Bubbling mudpots in NZ geothermal springs. Bubbles burst when the force of the expanding gas exceeds the surface tension in the bubble - submitted by Matt Zwingraff 2011

Effects of wind and surface tension on spray from a water fountain - is this cool or what?! - submitted by Janka Lovering 2013

Dendritic patterns in sand at the beach (DB)

Water streams from flukes of a humpback whale at Stellwagon Bank - the bumps along the trailing edge reduce drag (DB)

Sheetflow Waves by Sullivan Deck – .mov file
Sheetflow of runoff along a paved surface organizes into rolling waves – submitted by Rowan Jones 2013

Evidence of the force of flowing water - note this picture is similar to some of the examples we analyzed in class. This is the Loyalsock River near Montoursville PA following Hurricane Lee, when much of the Sussquehanna River watershed experienced record flooding. Pic submitted by Jason Marshalek, 2013

Dead hummingbird outside Skillman Library. Although they are masters of flight through the fluid we call air, like many birds they are susceptible to reflective glass. Pic submitted by an anonymous tipster


See this youtube clip

Carly and some cool water droplets in a rainstorm in Rarotonga (South Pacific) – submitted by Carly Hatch.

Turbulent flow in the Susquehanna River downstream of Safe Harbor Hydroelectric Dam (submitted by Cody Harnish)

Cascading waterfalls at Plitvice Lakes National Park in Croatia. The lakes are famous for their distinctive colors which change constantly depending on the quantity of minerals or organisms in the water and the angle of sunlight. The blue tint of water is an inherent property caused by absorption and scattering of white light. The color may also be a result of dissolved or suspended impurities in the water (submitted by Becky Rolwood)

Walden Pond, perhaps the world’s most famous example of a kettle pond, left by retreating glaciers. Water is still remarkably clear since there is very little surfacewater inflow (submitted by Kathy Delsener)

Hot air balloon over College Hill. For buoyancy to push something up in the air, the balloon has to be lighter than an equal volume of air around it. Warmer air rises in cooler air. Hot air is lighter than cool air because it has less mass/volume (submitted by Chris Luna)

Sinter deposit in Rotorua, NZ. In this geothermal area, ground water is heated by the earth’s core. Heat/steam pressure and the resulting lower density of the water forces it to rise to the surface. If the water solution is saturated with enough silica then its viscosity increases so it slowly flows outward, becoming thinner as it flows, forming mounds and cones as it cools. Also, the picture also shows how if the water is heated enough so that its vapor pressure is equal to the pressure exerted on it by the atmosphere, it will evaporate into steam (submitted by Zack Benedetto)

Shown here is how the viscosity of water when combined with enough downstream force and upstream force(a rock) causes water to flow over the rock. The water flows over in a smooth continuous wave demonstrating the strength of surface tension (submitted by Cody Harnish)



wavessheetflow. Runoff heading down Sullivan Road, Sept 18, during 3-inch rain event. Sheet flow down a steep slope will show these roll waves, due to surface instabilities (the surface flow is faster than the flow beneath, and is not damped enough by shear to travel with the fluid below) that grow until a wave is formed.